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      Federal judge rules Alabama's abortion clinic law unconstitutional, state leaders plan an appeal

      {}A Federal judge has ruled Alabama's abortion law unconstitutional. {}Judge Myron Thompson says that state leaders exceeded their authority, when they passed the law last year requiring abortion clinic doctors, to have hospital admitting privileges."This ruling if it's allowed to stand would really put women in harms way," Rev. Terry Gensemer, pastor and pro-life activist said.Rev. Terry Gensemer is one of many who frequently pray outside Planned Parenthood - offering counseling to women who come to the clinic."The overwhelming majority of Evangelicals, Catholics, practicing Catholics, are pro-life people," Gensemer said. "They're non-violent, so to say they've created this climate of violence is wrong."We went to Montgomery to meet with Planned Parenthood V.P. of Public Policy, Nikema Williams. The organization was part of the lawsuit. Williams says {}the law makes abortions inaccessible."Judge Thompson's ruling says that it shouldn't matter where a woman lives, what her zip code is, if she is going to have access to a Constitutionally protected right to make private, personal healthcare decisions and that's what that ruling was," Williams said. "It was a victory for Alabama women."Supporters of the law say this ruling is a disappointment - even dangerous."It will be dangerous because there will be physicians who are allowed to come in and fly out, who don't have admitting privileges, and they'll be doing abortions on women," Gensemer said.{}Had the law gone into effect, three of Alabama's five clinics offering abortions would shut down."Judge Thompson's decision today says that this law that was passed in Alabama poses an undue burden on the women of Alabama and he even went further to say that the only thing more restrictive than this law, is an all out ban on abortion services," Williams said.Both State Attorney General Luther Strange and Lieutenant Governor Kay Ivey stated they're disappointed in the ruling. The plan now for state leaders is to appeal. {}
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